The first European to have visited Tahiti according to existing records was lieutenant Samuel Wallis, who was circumnavigating the globe in HMS Dolphin,[16] sighting the island on 18 June 1767,[17] and eventually harbouring in Matavai Bay. This bay was situated on the territory of the chiefdom of Pare-Arue, governed by Tu (Tu-nui-e-a'a-i-te-Atua) and his regent Tutaha, and the chiefdom of Ha'apape, governed by Amo and his wife "Oberea" (Purea). Wallis named the island King George's Island. The first contacts were difficult, since on the 24 and 26 June 1767,[18] Tahitian warriors in canoes showed aggression towards the British, hurling stones from their slings. In retaliation, the British sailors opened fire on the warriors in the canoes and on the hills. In reaction to this powerful counter-attack, the Tahitians laid down peace offerings for the British.[18] Following this episode, Samuel Wallis was able to establish cordial relations with the female chieftain "Oberea " (Purea) and remained on the island until 27 July 1767.[11]:45–84,104,135
Within the framework of this treaty, France recognised the sovereignty of the Tahitian state. The Queen was responsible for internal affairs, while France would deal with foreign relations and assure the defence of Tahiti, as well as maintain order on the island. Once the treaty had been signed there began a struggle for influence between the English Protestants and the Catholic representatives of France. During the first years of the Protectorate, the Protestants managed to retain a considerable hold over Tahitian society, thanks to their knowledge of the country and its language. George Pritchard had been away at the time. He returned however to work towards indoctrinating the locals against the Roman Catholic French.
(*) Published "from" package price is per person based on double occupancy and includes Economy Class round trip airfare from Los Angeles plus government fees and taxes. Package pricing is based on the lowest published promotional airfares and the lowest available hotel rates at time of publishing. These lowest airfares and rates are subject to availability which can result in actual price being higher than the advertised price. The package price validity dates are indicated on each package page. Different seasonal supplements will apply to travel at different times of the year. All airfares and flight schedules are subject to change at any time without prior notice. Fees for checked baggage may apply and vary by airline. For complete information, please visit the airline's Website. Due to currency exchange rate fluctuations, all land prices and taxes are subject to change at any time without prior notice. Package itinerary, availability and terms and conditions are subject to change at any time without prior notice. CST # 2098768-40
The Brando Resort combines luxury and environmental sustainability to create one of the finest eco-friendly resorts in the world. Located on the Tetiaroa atoll, also known as Marlon Brando's private island, this resort is meant to carry out his vision and his legacy. It is 100% energy independent and supports a number of research and conservation initiatives.
In 1767 Tahiti (then usually called Otaheite) was visited by Capt. Samuel Wallis of the British navy, who named it King George III Island. It was subsequently visited by Louis-Antoine de Bougainville (1768), who claimed it for France. He named it La Nouvelle Cythère (“The New Cythera”) in honour of the Greek island of Cythera. It was then visited by two English navigators, James Cook in 1769 and William Bligh in the HMS Bounty in 1788. The first permanent European settlers (1797) were members of the Protestant London Missionary Society, who helped the local Pomare family gain control of the entire island. Tahitian chief Pomare II (1803–24) embraced Christianity in 1815, triumphed over the other Tahitian rulers, and established a “missionary” kingdom with a scriptural code of law. However, the missionaries’ power was challenged during the reigns of Pomare III (1824–27) and Queen Pomare IV (1827–77) by Tahitian rivals and by the effects of disease, prostitution, and alcoholism, as well as the influence of European traders and beachcombers. After Queen Pomare IV deported two French Roman Catholic missionary priests in 1836, the French dispatched a warship in 1842 to demand reparations and to arrange a French protectorate. When Pomare V (Queen Pomare’s son) abdicated in 1880, Tahiti was proclaimed a French colony.

The Society archipelago is a hotspot volcanic chain consisting of ten islands and atolls. The chain is oriented along the N. 65° W. direction, parallel to the movement of the Pacific Plate. Due to the plate movement over the Society hotspot, the age of the islands decreases from 5 Ma at Maupiti to 0 Ma at Mehetia, where Mehetia is the inferred current location of the hotspot as evidenced by recent seismic activity. Maupiti, the oldest island in the chain, is a highly eroded shield volcano with at least 12 thin aa flows, which accumulated fairly rapidly between 4.79 and 4.05 Ma. Bora Bora is another highly eroded shield volcano consisting of basaltic lavas accumulated between 3.83 and 3.1 Ma. The lavas are intersected by post-shield dikes. Tahaa consists of shield-stage basalt with an age of 3.39 Ma, followed by additional eruptions 1.2 Ma later. Raiatea consists of shield-stage basalt followed by post-shield trachytic lava flows, all occurring from 2.75 to 2.29 Ma. Huahine consists of two coalesced basalt shield volcanoes, Huahine Nui and Huahine Iti, with several flows followed by post-shield trachyphonolitic lava domes from 3.08 to 2.06 Ma. Moorea consists of at least 16 flows of shield-stage basalt and post-shield lavas from 2.15 to 1.36 Ma. Tahiti consists of two basalt shield volcanoes, Tahiti Nui and Tahiti Iti, with an age range of 1.67 to 0.25 Ma.[4]

In November 1835 Charles Darwin visited Tahiti aboard HMS Beagle on her circumnavigation, captained by Robert FitzRoy. He was impressed by what he perceived to be the positive influence the missionaries had had on the sobriety and moral character of the population. Darwin praised the scenery, but was not flattering towards Tahiti's Queen Pōmare IV. Captain Fitzroy negotiated payment of compensation for an attack on an English ship by Tahitians, which had taken place in 1833.[30]
In 1767 Tahiti (then usually called Otaheite) was visited by Capt. Samuel Wallis of the British navy, who named it King George III Island. It was subsequently visited by Louis-Antoine de Bougainville (1768), who claimed it for France. He named it La Nouvelle Cythère (“The New Cythera”) in honour of the Greek island of Cythera. It was then visited by two English navigators, James Cook in 1769 and William Bligh in the HMS Bounty in 1788. The first permanent European settlers (1797) were members of the Protestant London Missionary Society, who helped the local Pomare family gain control of the entire island. Tahitian chief Pomare II (1803–24) embraced Christianity in 1815, triumphed over the other Tahitian rulers, and established a “missionary” kingdom with a scriptural code of law. However, the missionaries’ power was challenged during the reigns of Pomare III (1824–27) and Queen Pomare IV (1827–77) by Tahitian rivals and by the effects of disease, prostitution, and alcoholism, as well as the influence of European traders and beachcombers. After Queen Pomare IV deported two French Roman Catholic missionary priests in 1836, the French dispatched a warship in 1842 to demand reparations and to arrange a French protectorate. When Pomare V (Queen Pomare’s son) abdicated in 1880, Tahiti was proclaimed a French colony.
Explore the islands of Tahiti like never before. Begin your journey in Tahiti with a 4x4 Jeep safari through the rugged island interior. From there, head to Moorea where you will enjoy a guided ATV tour of the island, a jet ski tour of the lagoon and a snorkeling and ray feeding excursion. End your island adventure in Bora Bora where you will push your limits with either waterskiing or wakeboarding, an introductory PADI dive and a leisurely paddleboard tour of the glistening lagoon. 
Each district or clan was organised around their marae, or stone temple. Anne Salmond quotes John Orsmond, an early missionary, as stating, "Marae were the sanctity and glory of the land, they were the pride of the people of these islands." This was especially true for the ancestral and national marae associated with the royal line. "It was the basis of royalty; It awakened the gods; It fixed the red feather girdle of the high chiefs."[11]:23,26–27

3 Iconic islands, 3 prestigous resorts... You will have the chance to discover some of the most beautiful islands of the South Pacific. The Intercontinental resorts will offer you the comfort that you are looking for, with an amazing setting to enjoy during each step of your vacation. Embrace the magic and appreciate the tradition of warm polynesian welcoming. Indulge yourself with gorgeous places, lay back and relax...
Apart from a fertile coastal plain, the terrain of Tahiti is jagged and mountainous, rising to Mount Orohena (7,339 feet [2,237 metres]) on Tahiti Nui and to Roniu (4,340 feet [1,323 metres]) on Tahiti Iti. Many swift streams, the largest of which is the Papenoo in the north, descend to the coast. The island, 33 miles (53 km) long, is fringed by coral reefs and lagoons. Natural vegetation includes coconut palms, pandanus, hibiscus, and tropical fruit trees.
In about 1810, Pōmare II married Teremo'emo'e daughter of the chief of Raiatea, to ally himself with the chiefdoms of the Leeward Islands. On 12 November 1815, thanks to these alliances, Pōmare II won a decisive battle at Fe'i Pī (Punaauia), notably against Opuhara,[28] the chief of the powerful clan of Teva.[10] This victory allowed Pōmare II to be styled Ari'i Rahi, or the king of Tahiti. It was the first time that Tahiti had been united under the control of a single family. It was the end of Tahitian feudalism and the military aristocracy, which were replaced by an absolute monarchy. At the same time, Protestantism quickly spread, thanks to the support of Pōmare II, and replaced the traditional beliefs. In 1816 the London Missionary Society sent John Williams as a missionary and teacher, and starting in 1817, the Gospels were translated into Tahitian (Reo Maohi) and taught in the religious schools. In 1818, the minister William Pascoe Crook founded the city of Papeete, which became the capital of the island.
This emigration, across several hundred kilometres of ocean, was made possible by using outrigger canoes that were up to twenty or thirty meters long and could transport families as well as domestic animals. In 1769, for instance, James Cook mentions a great traditional ship (va'a) in Tahiti that was 33 m (108 ft) long, and could be propelled by sail or paddles.[7] In 2010, an expedition on a simple outrigger canoe with a sail retraced the route back from Tahiti to Asia.[8]
Followers of 'Oro were called ariori, and each district in Tahiti had an ariori lodge led by the avae parae, black leg. These leaders had legs tattooed from thigh to heel. The first 'Oro lodge was established around 1720 by Mahi, a representative of the high priest of Taputapuatea marae and Tamatoa I, the high chief of Ra'iatea. The first 'Oro marae was established at Tautira.[11]
Portuguese navigator Pedro Fernandes de Queirós, serving the Spanish Crown in an expedition to Terra Australis, was perhaps the first European to set eyes on the island of Tahiti. He sighted an inhabited island on 10 February 1606[12] which he called Sagitaria (or Sagittaria). However, whether the island that he saw was actually Tahiti or not has not been fully ascertained. It has been suggested that he actually saw the island of Rekareka to the south-east of Tahiti.[13] According to other authors the first European to arrive in Tahiti was Spanish explorer Juan Fernández in his expedition of 1576–1577.[14]

The island of Tahiti is divided into two parts: The larger portion to the northwest is known as Tahiti Nui, while the smaller, southeastern peninsula is known as Tahiti Iti. Tahiti Nui is dominated by three extinct volcanic mountains including Mount Orohena, the tallest in French Polynesia; Mount Aorai, known for its incredible views; and Le Diadème, which appears to crown the island as the rightful queen.
Experience romance at the InterContinental Bora Bora Le Moana Resort when you stay five nights in an Overwater Lagoon Jr. Suite Bungalow overlooking Bora Bora's famous lagoon. Trip includes roundtrip international air from Los Angeles, all transfers and inter-island air, free daily breakfast for two, outrigger canoe breakfast, shark and ray snorkel safari, Jet Ski Tour, a lunch at Bloody Mary's, a 4x4 Cultural Island Tour with Sunset  Champagne at the crater, complimentary Internet access, plus added romantic amenities for our honeymoon clients. Package price reflects 90-day advance purchase resort discount. FROM $3,475 5 NIGHTS
Interestingly enough, there are no "official" all inclusive resorts in Bora Bora. And the term “all inclusive” is not common in French Polynesia. When we refer to an all inclusive Bora Bora package it usually means 3 meals daily. Normally it includes breakfast buffet, 2-course lunch and 3-course dinner. Beverages are usually extra. Certain days of the week a resort might offer themed buffet dinners. There could be supplemental charges for fine dining or for certain menu items (e.g. lobster). 

Tahiti really is the hub of all cultural activity. Every July, the annual Heiva I Tahiti transforms the island into a spectacular celebration of Polynesian culture and dance. Year round, you can also catch an authentic Tahitian dance show at the InterContinental Resort every Friday and Saturday night. Permanent historical fixtures include the house of James Norman Hall, Point Venus, the Museum of Tahiti and Her Islands, the Paul Gauguin Museum, and the Harrison Smith Botanical Gardens. These can all be seen on a guided Circle Island Tour, or you can rent a car and explore the island at your leisure.
In between the visits of Cook and Bonechea, the war of succession resumed amongst the Tahitian clans. This time Tutaha and his allies fought Vehiatua and his. Several famous battles were fought, including 'Taora ofa'i' (shower of stones) and 'Te-tamai-i-te-tai-'ute 'ute' (the battle of the red sea). Tutahua and Tepau were eventually killed in battle, while Vehiatua died of old age. Vehiatua's son, Paitu, became Vehiatua II, while Tu became paramount chief of the island, ari'i maro 'ura.[11]:242–244,273
During the same period about a thousand Chinese, mainly Cantonese, were recruited at the request of a plantation owner in Tahiti, William Stewart, to work on the great cotton plantation at Atimaono. When the enterprise resulted in bankruptcy in 1873, a few Chinese workers returned to their country, but a large number stayed in Tahiti and mixed with the population.
Tahiti (/təˈhiːti/; French pronunciation: ​[ta.iti]; previously also known as Otaheite (obsolete)) is the largest island in the Windward group of French Polynesia. The island is located in the archipelago of the Society Islands in the central Southern Pacific Ocean, and is divided into two parts: the bigger, northwestern part, Tahiti Nui, and the smaller, southeastern part, Tahiti Iti. The island was formed from volcanic activity and is high and mountainous with surrounding coral reefs. The population is 189,517 inhabitants (2017 census),[1] making it the most populous island of French Polynesia and accounting for 68.7% of its total population.
On 2 April 1768,[19] it was the turn of Louis-Antoine de Bougainville, aboard Boudeuse and Etoile on the first French circumnavigation, to sight Tahiti. On 5 April, he anchored off Hitiaa O Te Ra, and was welcomed by its chief Reti. Bougainville was also visited by Tutaha. Bougainville only stayed about ten days on the island, which he called "Nouvelle-Cythère ", or "New Cythera (the island of Aphrodite)", because of the warm welcome he had received, the sweetness of the Tahitian customs, calling it a "sailor's Paradise." Ahutoru accompanied the French on the return voyage, becoming the first Tahitian to sail on a European vessel.[11]:93–109 The account Bougainville and Philibert Commerson gave of his port of call would contribute to the creation of the myth of a Polynesian paradise and nourished the theme of the noble savage, so dear to Jean-Jacques Rousseau, which was very much in fashion.[11]:116–118 Between this date right until the end of the 18th century, the name of the island was spelled phonetically "Taïti". Beginning in the 19th century, the Tahitian orthography "Tahiti" became normal usage in French and English.[20]
Other popular activities include snorkeling, Jet Skiing and surfing. Experienced surfers should visit the famed Teahupo'o and bear witness to one of the world's most intense waves. Beginners can surf or take lessons at some of the more mellow beaches around the island. You can also enjoy a day of golfing at the Olivier Bréaud Golf Course, one of only two courses in French Polynesia.  
Each district or clan was organised around their marae, or stone temple. Anne Salmond quotes John Orsmond, an early missionary, as stating, "Marae were the sanctity and glory of the land, they were the pride of the people of these islands." This was especially true for the ancestral and national marae associated with the royal line. "It was the basis of royalty; It awakened the gods; It fixed the red feather girdle of the high chiefs."[11]:23,26–27
Well, fortunately for you and your future spouse, there isn’t a bad time to visit Bora Bora. This is another reason that Bora Bora is a great honeymoon destination – because you can get married any time of the year and take off for your honeymoon immediately following the ceremony. Considering Bora Bora’s proximity to the equator and its Oceanic location, “summer” and “winter” don’t really exist. The average high temperature in Bora Bora is 30 C (85F) and the average low is 25 C (77 F). Regardless of when you visit only material differences throughout the year are the hours of sunshine and the quantity of rain. The driest month (August) sees a couple inches of rain while the wettest month (December) sees almost a foot. August similarly sees the most sunshine and January happens to be the darkest month.

The Sofitel Bora Bora Private Island is found on a small botanical garden surrounded by water. Located on a private island enclosed in the southeast end of the lagoon, the resort is only two minutes away by boat from the main island. Unlike many other reef resorts that have lagoon on one side and ocean on the other, this retreat is completely encircled by the lagoon, creating an all-around gorgeous view of Bora Bora. It is also reserved exclusively for adults and children over the age of twelve, maintaining a quiet and intimate oasis for couples and honeymooners.
In between the visits of Bougainville and Cook, in December 1768, a war of succession amongst the Tahiti's clans took place for who would assume the role of paramount chief. Tutaha's Pare-'Arue army allied with Vehiatua's Tai'arapu army, Pohuetea's Puna'auia army, To'ofa's Paea army, and Tepau-i-ahura'i (Tepau) of Fa'a'a, to defeat Amo and Purea in Papara. The warriors, women and children of Papara were massacred, while their houses, gardens, crops and livestock destroyed. Even the Mahaiatea marae was ransacked, while Amo, Purea, Tupaia and Teri'irere fled into the mountains. Vehiatua built a wall of skulls (Te-ahu-upo'o) at his Tai'arapu marae from his war trophies.[11]:134–140,144–145,196
On 26 October 1788, HMS Bounty, under the command of Captain William Bligh, landed in Tahiti with the mission of carrying Tahitian breadfruit trees (Tahitian: 'uru) to the Caribbean. Sir Joseph Banks, the botanist from James Cook's first expedition, had concluded that this plant would be ideal to feed the African slaves working in the Caribbean plantations at very little cost. The crew remained in Tahiti for about five months, the time needed to transplant the seedlings of the trees. Three weeks after leaving Tahiti, on 28 April 1789, the crew mutinied on the initiative of Fletcher Christian. The mutineers seized the ship and set the captain and most of those members of the crew who remained loyal to him adrift in a ship's boat. A group of mutineers then went back to settle in Tahiti.

Simply put, Bora Bora embodies the perfect and most idyllic honeymoon destination. This is a place to come for bright blue lagoons, charming bungalow accommodations, relaxing sandy beaches, and brightly colored hibiscus flowers. Located in French Polynesia in the South Pacific islands, Bora Bora has been described as the most beautiful island in the world.
High mountains and dramatic scenery set the stage for this ultra-romantic paradise honeymoon destination. Highlights of this honeymoon include hiking Mount Pahia, scuba diving, Teavanui Pass, Marotetini royal Marae, and the beautiful lagoon. Bora Bora is known as the Pearl of the Pacific, and there are many amazing hotels and resorts to choose from to make your stay comfortable and luxurious.
Tahiti really is the hub of all cultural activity. Every July, the annual Heiva I Tahiti transforms the island into a spectacular celebration of Polynesian culture and dance. Year round, you can also catch an authentic Tahitian dance show at the InterContinental Resort every Friday and Saturday night. Permanent historical fixtures include the house of James Norman Hall, Point Venus, the Museum of Tahiti and Her Islands, the Paul Gauguin Museum, and the Harrison Smith Botanical Gardens. These can all be seen on a guided Circle Island Tour, or you can rent a car and explore the island at your leisure.
Pautu and Tetuanui returned to Tahiti with Bonechea aboard Aguila on 14 November 1774, Tipitipia and Heiao having passed away in the interim. Bonechea died on 26 January 1775 in Tahiti, and was buried near the Spanish mission at Tautira Bay. Lt. Tomas Gayangos took over command. Gayangos set sail for Peru on 27 Jan, leaving the two friars, Father Geronimo Clota and Father Narciso Gonzalez, and Maximo Rodriguez and Francisco Perez, in charge of the Spanish mission. However, the Spanish mission on Tahiti was abandoned on 12 November 1775, after Aguila's third voyage to Tahiti, when the Fathers begged its commander, Don Cayetano de Langara, to take them back to Lima.[25] Some maps still bear the name Isla de Amat for Tahiti, named after Viceroy Amat who ordered the expedition.[26] A most notable result of these voyages was the journal by a marine in the Spanish Navy named Maximo Rodriguez, which contains valuable information about the Tahitians of the 18th century, augmented with the accounts by the Chilean Don Jose de Andia y Varela.[11]:321,323,340,351–357,361,381–383
Well, fortunately for you and your future spouse, there isn’t a bad time to visit Bora Bora. This is another reason that Bora Bora is a great honeymoon destination – because you can get married any time of the year and take off for your honeymoon immediately following the ceremony. Considering Bora Bora’s proximity to the equator and its Oceanic location, “summer” and “winter” don’t really exist. The average high temperature in Bora Bora is 30 C (85F) and the average low is 25 C (77 F). Regardless of when you visit only material differences throughout the year are the hours of sunshine and the quantity of rain. The driest month (August) sees a couple inches of rain while the wettest month (December) sees almost a foot. August similarly sees the most sunshine and January happens to be the darkest month.
In a surprise result, Oscar Temaru's pro-independence progressive coalition, Union for Democracy, formed a government with a one-seat majority in the 57-seat parliament, defeating the conservative party, Tahoera'a Huiraatira, led by Gaston Flosse. On 8 October 2004, Flosse succeeded in passing a censure motion against the government, provoking a crisis. A controversy is whether the national government of France should use its power to call for new elections in a local government in case of a political crisis.
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